PERFORMING AND INTERPRETING STANDARD CURVES
Preparing solutions for a standard curve --> FLASH animation
Interpreting the resulting graph --> FLASH animation
Using Excel to create the graph --> Adobe Captivate tutorial
Have a go yourself --> Captivate interactive tutorial
Using Excel to produce a linear equation --> Captivate tutorial
Have a go yourself --> Captivate interactive tutorial
Using Excel to make final calcuations --> Captivate tutorial


TITLE: PREPARING SOLUTIONS FOR THE STANDARD CURVE

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If we now look at sequential dilutions, these are really important if we want to make accurate calibration curves. So for example if we need a 1 in 2, 1 in 5, 1 in 10, 1 in 20, 1 in 50, 1 in 100, 1 in 500 and a 1 in 1000, at first this could seem quite daunting. All we need to do is initially make a 1 in 2, 1 in 5 and 1 in 10, this is because the rest are simply serial 1 in 10 dilutions of these.

Lets look at this in stages. Stage 1. 1 part A and 1 part B gives a 1 in 2 dilution (C2). 1 part A and 4 parts B gives a 1 in 5 (C5). 1 part A and 9 parts B gives a 1 in 10 (C10).

Stage 2. Take 1 part of C2 and 9 parts B gives us 1 in 20 (C20). 1 part of C 5 and 9 parts of B gives us 1 in 50 (C50). 1 part of C10 and 9 parts B gives us 1 in 100 (C100). Dilute C50 and C100 10 fold to give us 1 in 500 (C500) and 1 in 1000 (C1000). We make dilutions in this way for reasons of accuracy.

 

 

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